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State Privacy Patchwork Spreads with Signing of Colorado Privacy Act

On July 7, 2021, Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed the Colorado Privacy Act (CPA) into law, the latest in the recent wave of state privacy legislation but unlikely to be the last. The CPA will take effect July 1, 2023, six months after Virginia’s Consumer Data Protection Act (CDPA) and the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) become effective. Organizations subject to the new Colorado law will have to prepare for new consumer rights and restrictions with respect to Colorado consumers’ personal data. What follows are key takeaways from the CPA and the implications for businesses grappling with the changing privacy landscape in the US.

Applicability and Exemptions

Not all organizations will be covered by the new CPA. To be subject to the law, an organization must do business in Colorado and meet one of the following requirements:

  • The organization processes data on 100,000 or more Colorado consumers annually.
  • The organization processes data on 25,000 or more Colorado consumers annually and “sells” any personal data.

This applicability threshold sets a relatively high bar, and many companies that are subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA)/CPRA may not meet these thresholds in Colorado.

There are a number of exemptions and limitations built into the Colorado law. Personal data regulated under existing federal privacy regimes, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), will be exempt from the CPA, as will personal data about employees and others “acting in a commercial or employment context.” Further, the CPA’s substantive requirements will not limit organizations’ ability to process data for legal compliance, fraud prevention, security, contract fulfillment or any “internal operations that are reasonably aligned with the expectations of the consumer based on the consumer’s existing relationship” with the organization.

Substantive Rights Largely Mirror Other State Privacy Laws

The CPA establishes a number of substantive rights that Colorado consumers will have with respect to their personal data. In general, these rights mirror those in the existing laws in California and Virginia, including the following:

  • Notice. Covered organizations will be required to disclose data collection and processing details in their public-facing privacy policies. In addition, a new “duty of purpose specification” requires that companies identify the “express purposes for which personal data are collected and processed.” Whether existing privacy policies are sufficiently “express” for these purposes will be an important consideration for organizations under the CPA and one that will likely lead to both confusion and potential regulation in the future.
  • Access, Correction and Deletion. Consumers will have the right to access, correct and delete their personal data. For the right to access, businesses will be required to provide data in a portable format where feasible.
  • Opt Out. Consumers have the ability to opt out of data “sales,” targeted advertising and high-risk automated “profiling.”
  • Opt In. As with the CDPA, businesses must seek opt-in consent before collecting or processing “sensitive personal data,” which includes data revealing an individual’s race, ethnicity, religious beliefs, [...]

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California Voters Approve the California Privacy Rights Act

On November 3, 2020, California voters passed the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) ballot initiative with slightly under 60% of votes to approve the measure (as of publication). The ballot initiative, which was submitted by the architects of the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA), had earlier garnered 900,000 signatures—far more than the roughly 625,000 necessary for certification on the 2020 ballot.

The CPRA amends the CCPA, adds new consumer rights, clarifies definitions and creates comprehensive privacy and data security obligations for processing and protecting personal information. These material changes will require businesses to—again—reevaluate their privacy and data security programs to comply with the law.

Effective date and timeline for enforcement

The CPRA amendments become operative on January 1, 2023, and will apply to personal information collected by businesses on or after January 1, 2022 (except with respect to a consumer’s right to access their personal information). Enforcement of the CPRA amendments will not begin until July 1, 2023.

The CCPA’s existing exemptions for business contacts, employees, job applicants, owners, directors, officers, medical staff members and independent contractors will remain in effect until December 31, 2022.

The newly created California Privacy Protection Agency (“Agency”) will be required to adopt final regulations by July 1, 2022. For more information about the Agency and its role in enforcing the amended CCPA, see our previous article.

The passage of the CPRA does not affect the enforceability of the CCPA as currently implemented.

New rights under the CPRA

In addition to the CCPA’s rights to know, to delete, and to opt out of the sale of personal information, the CPRA creates the following new rights for California consumers:

  • The right to correct personal information
  • The right to limit the use of sensitive personal information
  • The right to opt out of the “sharing” of personal information

These rights are explained in greater detail in our previous article.

New compliance obligations for businesses subject to the CPRA?

The CPRA creates new obligations that are similar to the data processing principles found in the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Such responsibilities include:

  • Transparency: Businesses must specifically and clearly inform consumers about how they collect and use personal information and how they can exercise their rights and choice;
  • Purpose limitation: Businesses may only collect consumer’s personal information for specific, explicit and legitimate disclosed purposes and may not further collect, use or disclose consumers’ personal information for reasons incompatible with those purposes;
  • Data minimization: Businesses may collect consumers’ personal information only to the extent that it is relevant and necessary to the purposes for which it is being collected, used and shared;
  • Consumer rights: Businesses must provide consumers with easily accessible means to obtain their personal information, delete it or correct it, and to opt out of its sale and the sharing across business platforms, services, businesses and devices, and to limit the use of their sensitive information; and
  • Security: Businesses are required to take reasonable precautions to [...]

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The Uncertain “State” of US Data Protection Law: California Leads the Way

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA), which took effect this year, introduced a complicated data protection framework for the personal information of California residents, imposing a variety of new obligations on affected businesses. Although the interpretation of many of the CCPA’s provisions remains unsettled—and proposed regulations are still pending— the CCPA’s original architects have already advanced another proposed law, the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), which will be decided in a statewide referendum this November. If enacted, the CPRA would substantially amend the CCPA, granting consumers additional rights and imposing further liability on businesses.

Whether or not it passes, the proposed CPRA highlights the fluid state of the US legal environment for data protection, which has left businesses around the world struggling to account for the uncertain risks and compliance costs posed by these developments.

It did not have to be this way. The developments in California are due in part to the failure of the US Congress to enact comprehensive federal data protection legislation. Despite widespread support, compromise on a federal standard remains elusive, with legislators unable to agree on critical questions, such as whether or not the law will pre-empt state laws like the CCPA.

Click here to read the full article, and many more in our latest International News: Focus on Global Privacy and Cybersecurity.




New California Privacy Ballot Initiative Would Expand the CCPA

A proposed ballot initiative in California known as the California Privacy Rights Act, which is likely to pass if placed on the 2020 ballot, would both clarify and expand the existing California Consumer Privacy Act. Companies doing business in the state should closely monitor these developments and prepare for compliance, as we outline in this article.

A California ballot initiative known as the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) would clarify and expand the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), granting significant new rights to consumers and imposing additional liability risks on companies doing business in the state. The CPRA is an update to the California Privacy Rights and Enforcement Act (CPREA) ballot initiative, which was proposed in late 2019 by the Californians for Consumer Privacy, which also sought to broadly amend and prevent changes to the CCPA that would undermine its consumer protections.

The proposed ballot initiative, submitted by the architects of the CCPA, garnered 900,000 signatures, far more than the roughly 625,000 necessary for certification on the 2020 ballot. Early polling reportedly shows strong support for the measure, so assuming the signatures are approved and the CPRA is placed on the ballot, it is considered likely to pass and to take effect on January 1, 2023.

The CPRA proposes a myriad of changes, and this article will not address them all. What follows is a discussion of the most significant changes for businesses and consumers in California, followed by enforcement and implementation considerations.

New Clarifications, Rights and Responsibilities

In a number of areas, the CPRA would modify the current CCPA in ways that are likely to be welcomed by companies grappling with the often ambiguous and unclear obligations under the current law:

  • “Personal information” would no longer include information that is manifestly made public by the individual or the media.
  • Businesses that receive deletion requests would be expressly permitted to maintain records of these requests for compliance purposes.
  • Consumers could no longer require a business to generate a list of “the categories of personal information it has collected about that consumer” in response to access requests.
  • “Service providers” and “contractors” (a new term that appears to replace the “third party” contract provisions) would not need to respond directly to consumer requests to access or delete information.

However, these changes are largely overshadowed by the initiative’s imposition of significant new rights for consumers and responsibilities for businesses subject to the CCPA. These include the following requirements:

  • Businesses would need to contend with a new opt-out right to “Limit the Use of My Sensitive Personal Information,” which would require enhanced scrutiny of business practices involving certain “sensitive” categories of information. These sensitive categories of information are reminiscent of (but broader than) the categories of information typically regulated by US data breach notification statutes or are considered “special categories” under the EU General Data Protection Regulation. For purposes of the CPRA, “sensitive” categories will include certain government identifiers (Social Security number, driver’s license, state identification card or passport number); a [...]

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CCPA Has Just Gone Into Effect, But Businesses May Need to Prepare for a New California Privacy Law

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is not yet one month old, but movement has already started on a new California privacy law. In November 2019, the advocacy group Californians for Consumer Privacy, led by Alastair Mactaggart, the architect of CCPA, submitted a proposed California ballot initiative to the Office of the California Attorney General that would build upon the consumer privacy protections and requirements established by CCPA. In December 2019, as required under state law, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra released a title for and summary of the proposed ballot initiative, which will be known as the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA).

Key Provisions of the CPRA

CPRA seeks to give California consumers additional control over and protection of their personal information in five core ways.

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