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Federal Agencies Partner to Warn Healthcare Systems of Imminent Cyber Threat

US hospitals and healthcare systems should be on high alert after a rare joint advisory issued by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Cybersecurity Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) warning all US hospitals and healthcare providers of an “increased and imminent cybercrime threat to US hospitals and healthcare providers.” The joint advisory can be found here. Access the article.

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OFAC Advisory Warns of Civil Penalties for Ransomware Payments

On October 1, 2020, the US Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued an advisory alert that serves as a warning to entities who have been or will be the victim of a ransomware attack. As such, the crucial decision of whether to pay a ransom now comes with the additional risk of legal scrutiny by a powerful federal agency and the possibility of steep fines. Access the article.

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Uber Criminal Complaint Raises the Stakes for Breach Response

On August 20, 2020, a criminal complaint was filed charging Joseph Sullivan, Uber's former chief security officer, with obstruction of justice and misprision of a felony in connection with an alleged attempted cover-up of a 2016 data breach. These are serious charges for which Mr. Sullivan has the presumption of innocence. At the time of the 2016 data breach, Uber was being investigated by the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in connection with a prior data breach that occurred in 2014. According to the complaint, the hackers behind the 2016 breach stole a database containing the personal information of about 57 million Uber users and drivers. The hackers contacted Uber to inform the company of the attack and demanded payment in return for their silence. According to the complaint, Uber's response was to attempt to recast the breach as a legitimate event under Uber's "bug bounty" program and pay a bounty. An affidavit submitted with the complaint portrays a...

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NYDFS—First Enforcement Action under Cybersecurity Regulation

On July 21, 2020, the New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) announced that it had filed its first enforcement action under 23 NYCRR 500 (the "Cybersecurity Regulation") against a large title insurance provider. Covered entities should closely monitor this enforcement action. Access the article.

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Importance of CCPA Compliance Highlighted by First Round of Private Actions

The first wave of California Consumer Privacy Act litigation has begun to roll in, and the complaints are already raising interesting questions about the scope of CCPA’s private right of action. The actions assert a variety of claims under numerous theories and present a broad range of potential risks to businesses subject to CCPA. In light of the many questions that surround CCPA’s private right of action, the extent of possible liability from private litigation is still largely unknown and potentially significant. The first wave of private lawsuits filed under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) has begun to roll in, and the complaints are already raising interesting questions about the scope of CCPA’s private right of action. The recent explosion in popularity of video conferencing and social media software in response to the COVID-19 pandemic—and the technical issues some of these products have experienced—has inspired its own wave of litigation,...

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Comprehensive Federal Privacy Law Still Pending

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) has forced companies across the United States (and even globally) to seriously consider how they handle the personal information they collect from consumers. By its terms, however, the CCPA only protects the privacy interests of California residents; other “copy-cat” privacy laws proposed or enacted in other states similarly would only protect the rights of residents of each state. Given the burden on businesses imposed by the rapid proliferation of privacy and data protection laws, including data breach notification obligations, requirements for data transfer mechanisms imposed by international data protection laws (such as the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)), and the imposition of a variety of data subject rights, a comprehensive US federal privacy bill appears increasingly overdue. In the past year, US legislators have proposed a wide variety of data privacy laws—none of which seems to have gained...

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CCPA Has Just Gone Into Effect, But Businesses May Need to Prepare for a New California Privacy Law

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is not yet one month old, but movement has already started on a new California privacy law. In November 2019, the advocacy group Californians for Consumer Privacy, led by Alastair Mactaggart, the architect of CCPA, submitted a proposed California ballot initiative to the Office of the California Attorney General that would build upon the consumer privacy protections and requirements established by CCPA. In December 2019, as required under state law, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra released a title for and summary of the proposed ballot initiative, which will be known as the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA). Key Provisions of the CPRA CPRA seeks to give California consumers additional control over and protection of their personal information in five core ways. CPRA would require businesses to disclose when and how automated decision making is used for decisions that significantly affect a consumer’s...

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CCPA and ‘Reasonable Security’: A Game Changer

On January 1, 2020, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) went into effect. The CCPA applies to a wide range of companies and broadly governs the collection, use and sale of personal information of California residents (i.e., consumers and certain other individuals) and households. The CCPA provides that consumers may seek statutory damages of between $100 and $750, or actual damages if greater, against a company in the event of a data breach of nonredacted and nonencrypted personal information that results from the company’s failure to implement reasonable security. The amount of the statutory damages depends on factors such as the nature and seriousness of the company’s misconduct, the number of violations, the persistence of the company’s misconduct, the length of time over which the misconduct occurred, and the company’s assets, liabilities and net worth. To defend against these consumer actions, a company must show that it has implemented...

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Though CCPA is Now Live, Questions About Its Constitutionality Linger

As businesses have scrambled to obtain compliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) in recent months, questions surrounding its constitutionality have arisen. As a broad, sometimes unclear state law that imposes significant obligations on businesses around the country, CCPA may be ripe for legal challenge. The strongest bases for such challenges appear to be: (1) that CCPA violates the “Dormant Commerce Clause”; and (2) that CCPA is impermissibly vague. Dormant Commerce Clause The burden that CCPA imposes on out-of-state economic activity may place it in violation of the Dormant Commerce Clause, a legal doctrine created out of the Commerce Clause of the US Constitution. The Commerce Clause allows the US Congress to regulate interstate commerce; from this grant of power, courts have inferred a limitation on the authority of states to regulate interstate commerce, a doctrine coined the Dormant Commerce Clause. On this basis, courts will strike...

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Little by Little, Attorney General Becerra Sheds Light on the CCPA in 2020

Minimal Changes Expected to the Final Regulations On October 10, 2019, the Attorney General issued his Proposed Text of Regulations, along with a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Action and Initial Statement of Reasons. According to the Attorney General, the regulations will “benefit the welfare of California residents because they will facilitate the implementation of many components of the CCPA” and “provid[e] clear direction to businesses on how to inform consumers of their rights and how to handle their requests.” See Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, page 10. The deadline to submit public comments on the proposed regulations was December 6, 2019. The Office of the Attorney General (OAG) reported receiving about 1,700 pages of written comments from almost 200 parties. Despite this, the Attorney General stated in a news briefing that he does not expect the final regulations to include significant changes. The proposed regulations should give everyone a sense of...

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