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Privacy Considerations for COVID-19 Digital Contact Tracing

Generally, contact tracing refers to an effort by public health officials to identify individuals with whom a patient who has tested positive for an infectious disease has been in close proximity. Public health officials will inform these individuals that they were exposed to a contagious patient and encourage them to monitor their symptoms and quarantine for a period of time. In response to COVID-19, governments around the world have explored using digital contact tracing, by which smartphone users download an application (app) to enable public health officials to track infected individuals’ contacts. In addition, private sector companies are exploring how digital technologies can be used for contact tracing on employees as they reenter the workplace. Click here to read the full article, and many more in our latest International News: Focus on Global Privacy and Cybersecurity.

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Uber Criminal Complaint Raises the Stakes for Breach Response

On August 20, 2020, a criminal complaint was filed charging Joseph Sullivan, Uber's former chief security officer, with obstruction of justice and misprision of a felony in connection with an alleged attempted cover-up of a 2016 data breach. These are serious charges for which Mr. Sullivan has the presumption of innocence. At the time of the 2016 data breach, Uber was being investigated by the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in connection with a prior data breach that occurred in 2014. According to the complaint, the hackers behind the 2016 breach stole a database containing the personal information of about 57 million Uber users and drivers. The hackers contacted Uber to inform the company of the attack and demanded payment in return for their silence. According to the complaint, Uber's response was to attempt to recast the breach as a legitimate event under Uber's "bug bounty" program and pay a bounty. An affidavit submitted with the complaint portrays a...

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The Toughest Problem Set: Navigating Regulatory and Operational Challenges on University Campuses

When the academic year ended in the spring of 2020, many US university students assumed that a return to campus would be straightforward this fall. However, it is now clear—at least in the near term—that a return to the old “normal” will not be possible. Some universities have concluded that their best course of action is to offer only distanced learning for the time being. Other universities, however, are welcoming students back onto campus, and into residence and dining halls, classrooms, labs and libraries. Each of those universities is developing its own approach to retain the benefits of on-campus student life while reducing risk to the greatest extent possible; nevertheless, some have had to adjust their plans to pivot to remote learning when faced with clusters of positive cases on campus. One thing is clear: The fall semester will be a real-time, national learning laboratory. Because widespread, rapid testing remains unavailable in many locations,...

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COVID-19 Causing a Surge in E-Commerce—Is Your Website Accessible?

Stay-at-home orders and business closures during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic have led to a sharp increase in online shopping. While e-commerce has helped businesses stay afloat during this challenging economic time, there has also been a spike in litigation alleging that certain websites are not accessible to individuals with disabilities. In an article for Bloomberg Law, Jeremy White, Matthew Cin and Brian Long review the legal landscape governing accessibility of websites – including specific rules that apply to the healthcare industry, and explore best practices for companies to mitigate their risk of facing a website accessibility lawsuit. Click here to read the full article.

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Future Forward: Data Arrangements During and After COVID-19

The need for speedy and more complete access to data is instrumental for healthcare providers, researchers, pharmaceutical, biotech and device companies and public health authorities as they work to quickly identify infection rates, disease trends, outcomes, including antibodies, and opportunities for treatments and vaccines for COVID-19. A variety of data sharing and collaborations have emerged in the wake of this crisis, such as: Requests and mandates by public health authorities, either directly or via providers’ business associates requesting real time information on infections and bed and equipment availability Data sharing collaborations among providers for planning, anticipating and tracking COVID-19 caseloads Data sharing among providers, professional societies and pharmaceutical, biotech and medical device companies in search of testing options, treatment and vaccine solutions, and evaluation of co-morbidities CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE FULL...

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Is Your Software a Medical Device? FDA Issues Six Digital Health Guidance Documents

The 21st Century Cures Act, enacted in December 2016, amended the definition of “medical device” in section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) to exclude five distinct categories of software or digital health products. In response, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued new digital health guidance and revised several pre-existing medical device guidance documents. FDA also stated that it would continue to assess how to update and revise these guidance documents as its thinking evolved. Late last week, FDA issued five final guidance documents and re-issued a draft guidance document to better reflect FDA’s current thinking on software as a medical device (SaMD) and other digital health products: Changes to Existing Medical Software Policies Resulting from Section 3060 of the 21st Century Cures Act – Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff General Wellness: Policy for Low Risk Devices – Guidance for Industry...

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Live Webinar: Developing and Procuring Digital Health AI Solutions: Advice for Developers, Purchasers and Vendors

Join McDermott next Wednesday for a live webinar on the unique considerations in developing and procuring AI solutions for digital health applications from the perspective of various stakeholders. We will discuss the legal issues and strategies surrounding: Research and data mapping essential to the development and validation of AI technologies Protecting and maintaining intellectual property rights in AI solutions Technology development Risk management and mitigation for various contractual arrangements, including contracts with customers, vendors and users We will also focus on the trends in US law for AI solutions in the digital health space, and present actionable advice that will help you develop an effective strategy for developing and procuring AI solutions for digital health applications. Developing and Procuring Digital Health AI Solutions: Advice for Developers, Purchasers and Vendors Wednesday, June 13, 2018 | 11:00 am CT | 12:00 pm ET Register...

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Recycle, Recycle, Recycle: Key Considerations for Research, Medical Education, and Other Secondary Uses of Data

The digitization of health care and the proliferation of electronic medical records is happening rapidly, generating large quantities of data with potential to provide valuable insights into disease and wellness and help solve challenging public health problems. There is tremendous enthusiasm over the possibilities of leveraging this data for secondary use–i.e., a use of data that is distinct from the purpose for which it was originally collected. However, such secondary use is often subject to intersecting legal and regulatory regimes–including HIPAA, the Common Rule, and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and its implementing regulations–that are not fully harmonized.  This lack of harmonization in requirements, coupled with the wide range of industry players involved–including regulators, academic medical centers, health systems, payers, technology companies, manufacturers and industry entities, research institutions, registries, and professional...

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Surfing “Tech’s Next Big Wave”: Navigating the Legal Challenges in Digital Health

Fortune’s April 2018 cover story, “Tech's Next Big Wave: Big Data Meets Biology,” conveys loudly and clearly that technological innovation is transforming the health care continuum—changing the way care is delivered, as well as how patients manage their ongoing health—and as patient demand for health innovation increases, more companies seem eager to hop on the digital health bandwagon. The article provides a thoughtful, realistic (and somewhat sobering) perspective on digital health innovation’s successes and other results to date. It also quite effectively uses real world stories to convey the human dimension of digital health. One is the story of a mother who manually sampled and recorded her son’s glucose levels 20 times a day before an automated monitoring system connected to a mobile app allowed them both to live their lives without constant interruption by this critical care management function. Another describes use of an artificial intelligence...

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Telehealth and the Changing Regulatory Landscape: Opportunities and Challenges in the Digital Health Ecosystem

What if you didn’t have to take time out of your day to see a physician in person when you needed a prescription? What if a diagnosis could be delivered over video chat? What if your psychiatrist was available at the press of a button or swipe on your screen? These options are fast becoming a reality, as telehealth (or telemedicine) continues to take hold in a health care system that is desperate for increased efficiency and higher quality outcomes. And while telehealth offers exciting new possibilities in terms of convenience and access for patients, it also poses new regulatory challenges for industry stakeholders still learning the new rules of the game in today’s digital health ecosystem. The Chronic Care Act One of the biggest drivers of change in the industry right now is the Chronic Care Act. Last month, as part of the House and Senate budget deal to fund the government through March 23, legislators included the Creating High-Quality Results and...

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