The Uncertain “State” of US Data Protection Law: California Leads the Way

By on September 22, 2020
Posted In Data Privacy

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA), which took effect this year, introduced a complicated data protection framework for the personal information of California residents, imposing a variety of new obligations on affected businesses. Although the interpretation of many of the CCPA’s provisions remains unsettled—and proposed regulations are still pending— the CCPA’s original architects have already advanced another proposed law, the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), which will be decided in a statewide referendum this November. If enacted, the CPRA would substantially amend the CCPA, granting consumers additional rights and imposing further liability on businesses.

Whether or not it passes, the proposed CPRA highlights the fluid state of the US legal environment for data protection, which has left businesses around the world struggling to account for the uncertain risks and compliance costs posed by these developments.

It did not have to be this way. The developments in California are due in part to the failure of the US Congress to enact comprehensive federal data protection legislation. Despite widespread support, compromise on a federal standard remains elusive, with legislators unable to agree on critical questions, such as whether or not the law will pre-empt state laws like the CCPA.

Click here to read the full article, and many more in our latest International News: Focus on Global Privacy and Cybersecurity.

STAY CONNECTED

TOPICS

ARCHIVES