Federal Trade Commission

Jennifer Geetter and Lisa Schmitz Mazur wrote this bylined article on the regulatory implications of technology-supported devices, resources, and solutions that facilitate health patient-provider interaction. “Health industry regulators are struggling with how to apply the existing privacy regulatory regime, and the permitted uses and disclosures for which they provide, in this new world of healthcare innovation,” the authors wrote.

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New technologies and the expansion of the Internet of Things have allowed children of this generation to experience seamless interactive technologies through microphones, GPS devices, speech recognition, sensors, cameras and other technological capabilities. These advancements create new markets for entertainment and education alike and, in the process, collect endless amounts of data from children–from their names and locations to their likes/dislikes and innermost thoughts.

The collection of data through this Internet of Toys is on the tongues of regulators and law enforcement, who are warning parents to be wary when purchasing internet-connected toys and other devices for children. These warnings also extend to connected toy makers, urging companies to comply with children’s privacy rules and signaling that focused enforcement is forthcoming.

Federal Trade Commission Makes Clear That Connected Toy Makers Must Comply with COPPA

On June 21 2017, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) updated its guidance for companies required to comply with the Children’s Online Privacy and Protection Act (COPPA) to ensure those companies implement key protections with respect to Internet-connected toys and associated services. While the FTC’s Six Step Compliance Plan for COPPA compliance is not entirely new, there are a few key updates that reflect developments in the Internet of Toys marketplace. Continue Reading Regulating the Internet of Toys

On May 3, 2017, the Creating Opportunities Now for Necessary and Effective Care Technologies for Health Act of 2017 (S. 1016) (CONNECT Act of 2017) was reintroduced by the same six senators who had initially introduced the legislation in early 2016 and referred to the Senate Committee on Finance. As we previously reported on February 29, 2016, this iteration of the proposed bill also focuses on promoting cost savings and quality care under the Medicare program through the use of telehealth and remote patient monitoring (RPM) services, and incentivizing such digital health technologies by expanding coverage for them under the Medicare program—albeit using different terminology. Chiefly, the CONNECT Act of 2017 serves as a way to expand telehealth and RPM for Medicare beneficiaries, makes it easier for patients to connect with their health care providers and helps reduce costs for patients and providers. As with the previous iteration, the CONNECT Act of 2017 has received statements of support from over 50 organizations, including the American Medical Association, American Telemedicine Association, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, Connected Health Initiative, Federation of State Medical Boards, National Coalition on Health Care and an array of vendors and health systems. Continue Reading Round Two: Significant Telehealth Expansion Re-Proposed in Bipartisan Senate Bill

As one of the last states to retain highly restrictive (and arguably anti-competitive) telemedicine practice standards, health care providers, regulatory boards, technology companies, payors and other stakeholders have been actively monitoring Texas’ approach to telemedicine regulation and the related Teladoc case. Texas has eliminated its most restrictive requirement for delivering care via telemedicine in Texas, increasing opportunities for providers to reach patients using technology.  Senate Bill 1107 was passed on May 11, 2017, and the House added an amendment in passing Senate Bill 1107, which was approved in the Senate on May 18.  The bill was signed into law by Governor Abbott last weekend.

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Texas telehealth requirements will significantly change in the near future if Texas Senate Bill 1107 is passed into law, as it removes the controversial “face-to-face” or in-person consultation requirement to establish a physician-patient relationship and lawfully provide telehealth and telemedicine services within the state. This bill comes after a six-year-long battle between telemedicine stakeholders and the Texas Medical Board, and will better align Texas’ regulations with those found in other states.

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On August 3, 2016, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) staff submitted public comments regarding the Delaware Board of Occupational Therapy Practice’s proposed regulation for the provision of occupational therapy services via telehealth in Delaware (the Proposed Regulation).  The FTC’s comments to the Proposed Regulation follow its comments to Alaska’s telehealth legislation earlier this year and evidence its continued focus on telehealth’s ability to foster flexibility in health care delivery by increasing practitioner supply; encouraging competition; and improving access to affordable, quality health care.

By way of background, in 2015, Delaware amended its Insurance and Professions and Occupations Code (the Code) to include the regulation of telehealth and telemedicine services, including the delivery of occupational care remotely under existing, in-person standards of care.  Consistent with the Code, the Delaware Board of Occupational Therapy Practice (the Board) revised its rules and regulations to address telehealth services.  The Proposed Regulation defines telehealth as “the use of electronic communications to provide and deliver a host of health-related information and health care services, including occupational therapy related information and services, over electronic devices. Telehealth encompasses a variety of occupational therapy promotion activities, including consultation, education, reminders, interventions, and monitoring of interventions.”

The Proposed Regulation gives Occupational Therapist and Occupational Therapist Assistant licensees’ (Licensees) discretion in assessing and determining the appropriate level and type of care for an individual patient, provided that certain requirements are satisfied. Specifically, under the Proposed Regulation, Licensees that provide treatment through telehealth must have an active Delaware license in good standing to practice telehealth in the state of Delaware.  In addition to obtaining informed consent and complying with confidentiality requirements, the licensee must also: (1) be responsible for determining and documenting that telehealth is an appropriate level of care for the patient; (2) comply with the Board’s rules and regulations and all current standards of care requirements applicable to onsite care; (3) limit the practice of telehealth to the area of competence in which proficiency has been gained through education, training and experience; (4) determine the need for the physical presence of an occupational therapy practitioner during any interactions with patients, if he/she is the Occupational Therapist who screens, evaluates, writes or implements the plan of care; (5) determine the amount and level of supervision needed during the telehealth encounter; and (6) document in the file or record which services were provided remotely. (24 Del. Admin. Code § 2000-4.2.)

Staff of the FTC’s Office of Policy Planning and its Bureaus of Competition and Economics, responding to the Board’s request for public comments, stated that by not imposing rigid and unwarranted in-person care and supervision requirements, the Proposed Regulation could have various positive impacts, including: (1) improving access to cost-effective, quality care, especially for patients with limited mobility; (2) reducing Medicaid’s transportation expenditures as well as individuals’ pecuniary and time costs; (3) addressing anticipated workforce shortages in the health care sector by increasing practitioner supply and facilitating care of an aging population; and (4) enhancing competition, consumer choice and access to care.

The FTC did recommend the clarification of the Proposed Regulation on the scope of practice of Occupational Therapist Assistants.  The determination of the appropriateness of remote care and decisions about the amount and level of supervision during a telehealth encounter are expressly restricted to Occupational Therapists, while all other requirements also apply to Occupational Therapist Assistants.  The FTC noted that the ambiguities regarding the role of Occupational Therapist Assistants in telehealth evaluations and the determination of whether to use telehealth could discourage their participation in telehealth care.

In March 2016, the US Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) staff submitted public comments regarding the telehealth provisions of a proposed state bill in Alaska demonstrating the FTC’s continued focus on health care competition and general discouragement of anti competitive conduct in health care markets, with a renewed interest and focus on telehealth.

Continue Reading FTC Weighs-in on Telehealth: Providing Comments Regarding Alaska’s Proposed Licensure and Standard of Care Requirements

After intense negotiations, and after the official deadline had passed on Sunday, 31 January 2016, the United States and the European Union have finally agreed on a new set of rules—the “EU-U.S. Privacy Shield”—for data transfers across the Atlantic. The Privacy Shield replaces the old Safe Harbor agreement, which was struck down by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) in October 2015. Critics already comment that the Privacy Shield will share Safe Harbor’s fate and will be declared invalid by the ECJ; nevertheless, until such a decision exists, the Privacy Shield should give companies legal security when transferring data to the United States.

While a text of the new agreement is not yet published, European Commissioner Věra Jourvá stated that the Privacy Shield should be in place in the next few weeks. According to a press release from the European Commission, the new arrangement

…will provide stronger obligations on companies in the U.S. to protect the personal data of Europeans and stronger monitoring and enforcement by the U.S. Department of Commerce and Federal Trade Commission (FTC), including through increased cooperation with European Data Protection Authorities. The new arrangement includes commitments by the U.S. that possibilities under U.S. law for public authorities to access personal data transferred under the new arrangement will be subject to clear conditions, limitations and oversight, preventing generalized access. Europeans will have the possibility to raise any enquiry or complaint in this context with a dedicated new Ombudsperson.

One of the most known critics of the U.S. data processing practices and initiator of the ECJ Safe Harbor decision, Austrian Max Schrems, already reacted to the news. Schrems stated on social media that the ECJ Safe Harbor decision explicitly says that “generalized access to content of communications” by intelligence agencies violates the fundamental right to respect for privacy. Commissioner Jourová, referring to the Privacy Shield, stated that “generalized access … may happen in very rare cases”—which could be viewed as contradictory to the ECJ decision. Critics also argue that an informal commitment by the United States during negotiations with the European Union is not something on which European citizens could base lawsuits in the United States if their data is transferred or used illegally.

The European Commission will now prepare a draft text for the Privacy Shield, which still must be ratified by the Member States. The EU Parliament will also review the draft text. In the meantime, the United States will make the necessary preparations to put in place the new framework, monitoring mechanisms and new ombudsperson.

 

Remember KITT? KITT (the Knight Industries Two Thousand) was the self-directed, self-driving, supercomputer hero of the popular 1980s television show Knight Rider. Knight Rider was a science fiction fantasy profiling the “car of the future.” The self-directed car is science fiction no more. The future is now and, in fact, we’ve seen a lot of press this year about self-driving or driverless cars.

Driverless cars, equipped with a wide variety of connected systems including cameras, radar, sonar and LiDar (light detection and ranging), are expected on the road within the next few years. They can sense road conditions, identify hazards and negotiate traffic, all from a remote command center. Just as with most connected devices in the age of the Internet of Things (IoT), these ultra-connected devices claim to improve efficiency and performance, and enhance safety.

Though not quite driverless yet, connected vehicles are already on the market, in-market and on the road. Like many IoT “things”, ultra-connected vehicles systems may be vulnerable to hacker attacks.

Christopher Valasek and Charlie Miller, two computer security industry leaders, have presented on this topic at various events, including the 2014 Black Hat USA security conference . They analyzed the information security vulnerabilities of various car makes and models, rating the vehicles on three specific criteria: (1) the area of their wireless “attack surface” (i.e., how many data incorporating features such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, keyless entry systems, automated tire monitoring systems); (2) access to the vehicles network through those data points; and (3) the vehicle’s “cyberphysical” features (i.e., connected features such as parking assist, automated braking, and other technological driving aides). This last category of features, combined with access through the data points outlined in items (1) and (2), presented a composite risk profile of each vehicle make’s hackability. Their conclusions were startling: radios, brakes, steering systems were all found to be accessible.

Miller and Valasek claim that their intent was to encourage car manufacturers to consider security in vehicle system connectivity and cyberphysical attributes. They approached vehicle manufacturers and shared their report with the Department of Transportation and the Society of Automobile Engineers. Some manufacturers promised to investigate their vehicle systems and correct the deficiencies. Some seemingly ignored the report altogether. They did, however, catch the attention of Senators Ed Markey (D-MA) and Richard Blumenthal (D-CT). On July 21, 2015, Senators Markey and Blumenthal introduced legislation that would direct the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to establish federal standards to secure vehicles and protect drivers’ privacy. The Security and Privacy in Your Car Act, aptly coined “the SPY Car Act”, would also require manufacturers to establish a ‘cyber dashboard’ that rates vehicle security, informing consumers as to the security performance of their vehicle.

As proposed, the SPY Car Act would require that all motor vehicles manufactured in the U.S. be “equipped with reasonable measures to protect against hacking attacks.” All “entry points” are to be protected through “reasonable” measures against hacking. Internal networks are to be isolated to prevent hacking of the software managing critical vehicle controls, such as braking or steering. Vehicles would undergo a vulnerability analysis including penetration testing based on industry “best security practices.” Furthermore, “Any motor vehicle that presents an entry point shall be equipped with capabilities to immediately detect, report and stop attempts to intercept driving data or control the vehicle.”

The legislation, as well as the continued research efforts of experts such as Valasek and Miller, support the notion that today’s automobiles are not only transportation devices, but also sophisticated computer systems. And like any other computer system, the data processed through them is vulnerable to attack. The more “connected,” the system, the more entry points that are potentially exposed and arguably vulnerable. The “car of the future” is here and the experts and legislators seem to be pushing to keep consumer safety in the driver’s seat.

On June 30, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) published “Start with Security: A Guide for Businesses” (the Guide).

The Guide is based on 10 “lessons learned” from the FTC’s more than 50 data-security settlements. In the Guide, the FTC discusses a specific settlement that helps clarify the 10 lessons:

  1. Start with security;
  2. Control access to data sensibly;
  3. Require secure passwords and authentication;
  4. Store sensitive personal information securely and protect it during transmission;
  5. Segment networks and monitor anyone trying to get in and out of them;
  6. Secure remote network access;
  7. Apply sound security practices when developing new products that collect personal information;
  8. Ensure that service providers implement reasonable security measures;
  9. Implement procedures to help ensure that security practices are current and address vulnerabilities; and
  10. Secure paper, physical media and devices that contain personal information.

The FTC also offers an online tutorial titled “Protecting Personal Information.”

We expect that the 10 lessons in the Guide will become the FTC’s road map for handling future enforcement actions, making the Guide required reading for any business that processes personal information.