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Stephen W. Bernstein specializes in e-health, “big data,” deployment of electronic health record systems and health-related matters affected by the internet and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), as well as private equity investments, mergers, acquisitions, affiliations and joint ventures involving technology, hospitals and physicians. Stephen is the global head of McDermott's Health Practice. Read Stephen Bernstein's full bio.

The need for speedy and more complete access to data is instrumental for healthcare providers, researchers, pharmaceutical, biotech and device companies and public health authorities as they work to quickly identify infection rates, disease trends, outcomes, including antibodies, and opportunities for treatments and vaccines for COVID-19.

A variety of data sharing and collaborations have emerged

A recent McDermott roundtable on European health private equity generated key insights into the future of medtech, digital health, and data analytics, and identified opportunities for companies and investors.

Digital health solutions are widely considered to be the next big growth market. Healthcare lags significantly behind other industries when it comes to digitization, but the potential opportunities are driving developers, healthcare providers, and investors to find solutions.

PATIENT CARE
A key point to bear in mind about healthcare technology is that success and adoption may often be measured by the quality of the users’ experience, the resulting clinical outcomes, short and long term cost savings, and the resulting margin for both investors and the health care system at large. These multi-faceted goals are best illustrated by the demands for i) greater efficiency, and ii) better patient outcomes.

Efficiency is typified by, for example, streamlined bookings and appointment reminders, algorithms that triage patients to ensure they are seen by the right person at the right time, and in-home patient monitoring after patients are discharged. Patient take-up is also an excellent gauge of efficiency, for example, a high tech product that measures and reports blood sugar is of no value if the interface is too complicated for an older population.

Better outcomes result from clinicians gathering and using data to determine the right treatment in the fastest possible time, and are demonstrated, for example, by permanent lifestyle changes, improvements in self-care or care outside hospital,accurate drug dosage and use of medicines, and, in direct contrast with other sectors, reduced, rather than increased, service usage.

PRIVACY AND REGULATORY HURDLES
One of the most obvious challenges inherent in digital health is data privacy and security. Stemming from that are issues relating to control of the data, the right to use it, and ownership of the analysis. The most successful companies are those that, from the very beginning, understand the regulatory landscape in which they are operating; are transparent in terms of where their data comes from; make clear the type of data at issue, be that identifiable, pseudonymized, anonymized, or something in between; and identify who will control what data in what form. The ability to marry up these factors is a key part of any new entrant’s value proposition.


Continue Reading Challenges and Opportunities in MedTech, Innovation and Digital Health

As discussed in the first post in this two-part series, new players from outside the traditional healthcare paradigm are joining forces with hospitals, health systems and other providers to drive unprecedented innovation. These unexpected partnerships are bringing new solutions to market and changing how business is done and care is delivered.

Many of these collaborations revolve around data and data sharing arrangements. Traditional health industry stakeholders such as hospitals and health systems (HHSs) are partnering with technology companies—both established and start-up—to develop and market digital health solutions that engage patients beyond the brick-and-mortar clinical setting. Digital health tools are making it easier for patients to receive care in a mobile setting and access their health data across various platforms and sources. These innovative partnerships thus hold out the possibility of delivering better, faster, more targeted care.

Addressing Community Concerns

At the same time, digital health collaborations can encounter challenges regarding data privacy and security, permissions and ownership. Historically, health data was housed in one place—within the health institution. But with the rise of digital health tools, health data has become ubiquitous, raising fears about how it may be used, aggregated and shared.


Continue Reading Getting Cross-Industry Collaborations Right, Part 2: All About That Data

Healthcare is facing an age of disruption from new market entrants and players outside the traditional healthcare paradigm. Unexpected partnerships are bringing fresh solutions to market and changing how business is done and care is delivered.

Many of these new partnerships are arising in conjunction with innovation investments by hospitals and health systems (HHSs). HHSs have always been a source of significant innovation through research and other avenues, but traditionally this work has been largely decentralized. Today, HHSs are formalizing their innovation efforts and finding ways to capitalize on those opportunities—which are abundant, thanks to HHSs’ physician workforce, research infrastructure, and access to patients and their data. These centralized innovation incubators make it easier for non-traditional players, such as tech companies, to pool resources with an HHS and bring game-changing solutions to market in an expedited fashion.

Whether they occur through an innovation center, cross-industry ventures in the healthcare sphere are still in their infancy. As such, they pose a number of challenges that require careful planning and a flexible mindset.

Vet Your Opportunities Thoroughly

In today’s push for value-driven transformation, HHSs and other health industry stakeholders have hundreds if not thousands of opportunities for partnerships knocking on their door. Diverse players, from tech vendors to start-ups to private equity firms, are queuing up for a chance to participate in the burgeoning health sector.

Faced with these abundant—and often novel—opportunities, HHSs have the task of sorting through their options and developing an efficient process to vet, select and pursue them. Too many choices is a good problem to have, but HHSs nonetheless face challenges as they determine the best way to triage potential partnerships and ventures. Key infrastructure components at HHSs include education of and buy-in by governing board, development of investment guidelines that align with mission, and building the innovation structure and team (often with contributors who come from outside of “traditional healthcare”). Once that infrastructure has been established, the HHS will be able to evaluate and pursue innovative ventures better and faster, in turn bringing solutions to market and to patients more quickly.


Continue Reading Getting Cross-Industry Collaborations Right, Part 1: A Transactions Perspective

A Collaborative Transformation Perspective on Digital Health

Healthcare is facing an age of disruption from new players and new market entrants from outside the traditional healthcare paradigm. These disruptors have varying degrees of experience in the highly regulated and closely scrutinized healthcare landscape. How can these parties work together across different cultures and regulatory environments

Stephen Bernstein, global chair of McDermott’s Health Industry Advisory Practice Group, sat down with This Week in Health Innovation at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco.

Stephen and Dr. Andre Berger, CEO of National ACO, discussed the role of advancing technologies in enhancing collaboration between key players in digital health—including doctors, heath plans,

On May 1, 2014, the White House released two reports addressing the public policy implications of the proliferation of big data. Rather than trying to slow the accumulation of data or place barriers on its use in analytic endeavors, the reports assert that big data is the “new normal” and encourages the development of policy