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Washington State Takes the Lead in CCPA Copycat Legislation Race, Trends Emerge

Since the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) took effect on January 1, 2020, “copycat” legislation has been introduced at a dizzying pace by state legislatures across the country. Taking their cues from CCPA, at last count 16 states have borrowed language from California’s watershed law regarding consumer notices, data subject rights requests, and definitions of “personal information, “sale” of data and other key items. The likely intent is to provide equal (or, in some cases, greater) protections to the residents of their states.

As a practical matter, however, none of the proposed laws is identical to CCPA (nor to each other); some look to the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and each takes a complex approach that requires careful reading. The proposed Washington Privacy Act (SB 6281) has been touted as the most comprehensive data protection law in the United States and combines elements of CCPA and GDPR, adding specific protections for biometric information. Late last week, the Washington House added significant enforcement “teeth” by passing an amendment that would provide a private right of action under the Washington Consumer Protection Act for any violation of the Privacy Act.

Despite the lack of uniformity among the recently proposed bills across the country, three key trends are emerging:

Trend #1 – Increased Push for a Private Right of Action

In Washington, pending legislation would extend the private right of action beyond alleged harm arising from data breaches to any violation of the proposed Washington Privacy Act. While prior versions of the legislation vested exclusive enforcement authority in the Washington Attorney General—with penalties up to $7,500 per violation—late last week, the Innovation, Technology and Economic Development Committee in the Washington House approved an amendment to SB 6281 under which any violation of the Privacy Act would be deemed a per se violation of Washington’s Consumer Protection Act. While it is unclear exactly how damages will ultimately be calculated, a broad private right of action is a significant enforcement mechanism for Washington consumers. Supporters of the amendment argued that without a private right of action, companies would have little incentive to comply with the law because the Attorney General’s office lacks the resources to undertake many enforcement actions.

Recent bills propose legislation that closely tracks the CCPA’s private right of action for individuals who allege that they were harmed by data breaches caused by a business’ failure to implement “reasonable security” measures. Both the Illinois Data Transparency and Privacy Act (SB 2330) and New Hampshire’s proposed privacy law, HB 1680, provide consumers with private right of action where personal information is (i) unencrypted and unredacted; and (ii) subject to exfiltration, theft or disclosure due to failure to implement reasonable data security procedures. Consumers may seek damages the greater of $100 – $750 per consumer, per incident or actual damages.

If Washington or other states enact data privacy laws with such provisions, the potential liability for organizations affected by data breaches or failing to comply with sweeping new privacy obligations could rapidly become [...]

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The Department of Transportation Helps Clear the Road for Autonomous Vehicles

The US Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently released A Vision for Safety 2.0, an update to its prior guidance on automated driving systems. The new guidance adopts a voluntary, flexible approach to regulation of automated driving systems and clarifies that it alone, and not the states, is responsible for regulating the safety design and performance aspects of such systems.

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