California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018
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State Privacy Patchwork Spreads with Signing of Colorado Privacy Act

On July 7, 2021, Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed the Colorado Privacy Act (CPA) into law, the latest in the recent wave of state privacy legislation but unlikely to be the last. The CPA will take effect July 1, 2023, six months after Virginia’s Consumer Data Protection Act (CDPA) and the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) become effective. Organizations subject to the new Colorado law will have to prepare for new consumer rights and restrictions with respect to Colorado consumers’ personal data. What follows are key takeaways from the CPA and the implications for businesses grappling with the changing privacy landscape in the US.

Applicability and Exemptions

Not all organizations will be covered by the new CPA. To be subject to the law, an organization must do business in Colorado and meet one of the following requirements:

  • The organization processes data on 100,000 or more Colorado consumers annually.
  • The organization processes data on 25,000 or more Colorado consumers annually and “sells” any personal data.

This applicability threshold sets a relatively high bar, and many companies that are subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA)/CPRA may not meet these thresholds in Colorado.

There are a number of exemptions and limitations built into the Colorado law. Personal data regulated under existing federal privacy regimes, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), will be exempt from the CPA, as will personal data about employees and others “acting in a commercial or employment context.” Further, the CPA’s substantive requirements will not limit organizations’ ability to process data for legal compliance, fraud prevention, security, contract fulfillment or any “internal operations that are reasonably aligned with the expectations of the consumer based on the consumer’s existing relationship” with the organization.

Substantive Rights Largely Mirror Other State Privacy Laws

The CPA establishes a number of substantive rights that Colorado consumers will have with respect to their personal data. In general, these rights mirror those in the existing laws in California and Virginia, including the following:

  • Notice. Covered organizations will be required to disclose data collection and processing details in their public-facing privacy policies. In addition, a new “duty of purpose specification” requires that companies identify the “express purposes for which personal data are collected and processed.” Whether existing privacy policies are sufficiently “express” for these purposes will be an important consideration for organizations under the CPA and one that will likely lead to both confusion and potential regulation in the future.
  • Access, Correction and Deletion. Consumers will have the right to access, correct and delete their personal data. For the right to access, businesses will be required to provide data in a portable format where feasible.
  • Opt Out. Consumers have the ability to opt out of data “sales,” targeted advertising and high-risk automated “profiling.”
  • Opt In. As with the CDPA, businesses must seek opt-in consent before collecting or processing “sensitive personal data,” which includes data revealing an individual’s race, ethnicity, religious beliefs, [...]

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2018 Digital Health Data Developments – Navigating Change in 2019

Data privacy and security legislation and enforcement saw significant activity in 2018 and early 2019. McDermott’s 2018 Digital Health Year in Review: Focus on Data report – the first in a four-part series – highlights notable developments and guidance that health care providers, digital health companies and other health care industry stakeholders should navigate in 2019. Here, we summarize four key issues that stakeholders should watch in the coming year. For more in-depth discussion of these and other notable issues, access the full report.

  1. EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) enhances protections for certain personal data on an international scale. US-based digital health providers and vendors that either (a) offer health care or other services or monitor the behavior of individuals residing in the EU, or (b) process personal data on behalf of entities conducting such activities should be mindful of the GDPR’s potential applicability to their operations and take heed of any GDPR obligations, including, but not limited to, enhanced notice and consent requirements and data subject rights, as well as obligations to execute GDPR-compliant contracts with vendors processing personal data on their behalf.
  2. California passes groundbreaking data privacy law. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which takes effect on January 1, 2020, will regulate the collection, use and disclosure of personal information pertaining to California residents by for-profit businesses – even those that are not based in California – that meet one or more revenue or volume thresholds. Similar in substance to the GDPR, the CCPA gives California consumers more visibility and control over their personal information. The CCPA will affect clinical and other scientific research activities of academic medical centers and other research organizations in the United States if the research involves information about California consumers.
  3. US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Civil Rights (OCR) continues aggressive HIPAA enforcement. OCR announced 10 enforcement actions and collected approximately $25.68 million in settlements and civil money penalties from HIPAA-regulated entities in 2018. OCR also published two pieces of guidance and one tool for organizations navigating HIPAA compliance challenges in the digital health space.
  4. Interoperability and the flow of information in the health care ecosystem continues to be a priority. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) submitted its proposed rule to implement various provisions of the 21st Century Cures Act to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in September 2018; this is one of the final steps before a proposed rule is published in the Federal Register and public comment period opens. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released its own interoperability proposed rule and finalized changes to the Promoting Interoperability (PI) programs to reduce burden and emphasize interoperability of inpatient prospective payment systems and long-term care hospital prospective payment systems.



California Enacts a Groundbreaking New Privacy Law

California’s Senate and Assembly unanimously approved AB 375 (also known as the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018), on June 28, 2018. This new consumer privacy bill will be the most progressive and comprehensive privacy law in the United States, reaching far beyond California’s borders to give California consumers more visibility and control over their personal information.

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