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Trending in Telehealth: February 5 – 12, 2024

Trending in Telehealth highlights state legislative and regulatory developments that impact the healthcare providers, telehealth and digital health companies, pharmacists and technology companies that deliver and facilitate the delivery of virtual care.

Trending in the past week:

  • Interstate compacts
  • Facilitation of connectivity and data exchange
  • Professional standards

A CLOSER LOOK

Finalized Legislation & Rulemaking

  • South Dakota enacted the Social Work Licensure Compact, becoming the second state to enact the compact. Missouri enacted the compact in July 2023. The compact will become active once enacted by seven states. According to the National Center for Interstate Compacts, 24 other states have introduced the compact.

Legislation & Rulemaking Activity in Proposal Phase

Highlights:

  • In Idaho, HB 393 passed the first chamber. If enacted, it would enter Idaho into the Counseling Compact.
  • In Indiana, SB 132 passed the first chamber. Currently, Indiana law provides that an out-of-state provider licensed in Indiana may not provide telehealth services in Indiana until the provider and their employer/contractor have filed a certification with the Indiana Professional Licensing Agency that the provider and employer/contractor agree to be subject to Indiana jurisdiction and Indiana substantive and procedural laws. If enacted, the bill would remove the requirement to file the certification, though providers would still be subject to Indiana jurisdiction and Indiana substantive and procedural laws, and the provision of health services (rather than the filing of the certification) would constitute a voluntary waiver of other jurisdictional rights.
  • In West Virginia, HB 5310 passed the first chamber. If enacted, the bill would enact the Remote Patient Outcome Improvement Act to authorize insurers and providers to partner with internet service providers to facilitate the transmission and analysis of vital signs and medical device data.
  • In Wisconsin, the Marriage and Family Therapy, Professional Counseling and Social Worker Examining Board proposed a rule that would update telehealth practice standards by defining telehealth, creating of a new subsection that establishes standards of telehealth practice, amending the definitions of “face-to-face” and “supervision” to include telehealth practice, and amending of unprofessional conduct provisions to incorporate telehealth practice.

Why it matters:

  • States continue to increase activity surrounding licensure compacts for a variety of health professionals. These state efforts ease the burdens of the licensing process and demonstrate a desire to facilitate multijurisdictional practice without giving up authority over professional licensure.
  • Measures emphasizing connectivity and infrastructure complement the increasing availability of reimbursement for remote monitoring and other virtual care modalities. States propose measures such as West Virginia’s Remote Patient Outcome Improvement Act with the expectation that they will help reduce costs of avoidable emergency room and other medical visits when paired with remote monitoring programs.
  • States continue to amend and clarify professional practice standards for telehealth. With the increase in the delivery of care through virtual modalities, professional boards are adopting standards governing telehealth practice across multiple health professions and revising [...]

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Trending in Telehealth: January 29 – February 5, 2024

Trending in Telehealth highlights state legislative and regulatory developments that impact the healthcare providers, telehealth and digital health companies, pharmacists and technology companies that deliver and facilitate the delivery of virtual care.

Trending in the past week:

  • Interstate compacts
  • Medicaid coverage
  • Private payor coverage

A CLOSER LOOK

Legislation & Rulemaking Activity in Proposal Phase
Highlights:

  • In Michigan, HB 4579 and HB 4580 passed both chambers. If enacted, the bills would require coverage parity of telehealth services in health plans and Medicaid, respectively.
  • In New Hampshire, SB 318 passed the first chamber. If enacted, the bill would enter New Hampshire into the Social Work Licensure Compact.
  • In South Carolina, H 4159 passed both chambers. If enacted, the bill would create a new “South Carolina Telehealth and Telemedicine Modernization Act,” which would regulate all licensees providing services via telehealth. The bill would also revise the Medical Practice Act statutes related to telehealth, including addressing ongoing care provided by an out-of-state physician not licensed in telehealth, as well as implementing standards for licensees solely providing services via telehealth (including evaluation, recordkeeping, follow-up care and prescribing standards).
  • In South Dakota, HB 1012 and HB 1015 passed the first chamber. If enacted, the bills would enter South Dakota into the Counseling Compact and Social Work Licensure Compact, respectively.
  • In Tennessee, SB 1862 and HB 1863 passed the first chamber. If enacted, the bills would enter Tennessee into the Dietitian Licensure Compact.
  • In Tennessee, HB 2461 and SB 1674 passed the first chamber. If enacted, the bills would allow for Tennessee’s Medicaid program to reimburse qualifying remote ultrasound procedures and remote fetal nonstress tests when the patient is in a residence or other off-site location that is separate from the patient’s provider and the same standard of care is met.
  • In Utah, HB 44 passed both chambers. If enacted, the bill would enter Utah into the Social Work Licensure Compact.
  • In Utah, SB 24 passed the first chamber. If enacted, the bill would amend the statute providing for Medicaid reimbursement for telepsychiatric consultations to require coverage for telepsychiatric consultations conducted by physician assistants.
  • In Virginia, SB 2500 passed the first chamber. If enacted, the bill would require the Virginia Department of Medical Assistance Services to modify the state plan for medical assistance to include a provision allowing for reimbursement for remote ultrasound procedures and remote fetal nonstress tests under certain conditions.

Why it matters:

  • There continues to be an increase in activity surrounding licensure compacts. This includes established compacts, such as the Counseling Compact and Social Work Licensure Compact, as well as the Dietician Licensure Compact, which recently finalized its model legislation and has not yet been enacted in any states. In general, these state efforts ease the burdens of the licensing [...]

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Trending in Telehealth: January 22 – 29, 2024

Trending in Telehealth highlights state legislative and regulatory developments that impact the healthcare providers, telehealth and digital health companies, pharmacists and technology companies that deliver and facilitate the delivery of virtual care.

Trending in the past week:

  • Interstate compacts
  • Scope of practice
  • Medicaid reimbursement

A CLOSER LOOK

Finalized Legislation & Rulemaking

  • Arkansas passed final rule, which provides Medicaid coverage for ambulance telemedicine triage services. Specifically, an ambulance service may triage and transport a beneficiary to an alternative destination or treat in place if the ambulance service is coordinating the care of the beneficiary through telemedicine with a physician for a medical-based complaint or with a behavioral health specialist for a behavioral-based complaint.

Legislation & Rulemaking Activity in Proposal Phase

Highlights:

  • Florida proposed a rule to clarify the Board of Psychology’s supervised experience requirements in light of recent statutory changes involving telehealth.
  • Iowa proposed rules to clarify the scope of practice including recordkeeping, ethical practice standards, and use of telehealth visits for occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants and physical therapists and physical therapist assistants.
  • Nevada proposed a rule to define a social workers’ scope of practice and licensure requirements and clarify when services may be provided through telehealth to a client outside the State of Nevada, among other things.
  • South Carolina progressed H 4159 in the second chamber to enact the South Carolina Telehealth and Telemedicine Modernization Act. The bill defines necessary terms and provides requirements for certain regulated healthcare professionals who provide healthcare by means of telehealth; amends definitions in the medical practice act to define “telehealth”; and amends law relating to the practice of telemedicine to revise requirements for the practice of telemedicine and to include provisions concerning telehealth.
  • South Dakota progressed HB 1015 in the second chamber to adopt the social work licensure compact.
  • Utah progressed SB 24 in the first chamber. The bill clarifies the scope of practice of physician assistants to include telepsychiatry services.

Why it matters:

  • States continue to progress laws clarifying the use of telehealth within a practitioners’ scope of practice. This week, Florida, Iowa, Nevada and Utah proposed rules or progressed legislation clarifying that several healthcare practitioners’ scope of practice include the use of telehealth.

Telehealth is an important development in care delivery, but the regulatory patchwork is complicated. The McDermott digital health team works alongside the industry’s leading providers, payors and technology innovators to help them enter new markets, break down barriers to delivering accessible care and mitigate enforcement risk through proactive compliance. Are you working to make healthcare more accessible through telehealth? Let us help you transform telehealth.




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Trending in Telehealth: January 16 – 22, 2024

Trending in Telehealth highlights state legislative and regulatory developments that impact the healthcare providers, telehealth and digital health companies, pharmacists and technology companies that deliver and facilitate the delivery of virtual care.

Trending in the past week:

  • Interstate compacts
  • Behavioral health
  • Expanding telehealth

A CLOSER LOOK

Legislation & Rulemaking Activity in Proposal Phase

Highlights:

  • Florida progressed SB 7016, which expands the telehealth minority maternity care pilot program to a statewide program; enacts the interstate medical licensure compact; and enacts the audiology and speech-language pathology interstate compact.
  • Oklahoma proposed a rule to include the use of telemedicine within the optometrist’s scope of practice under certain circumstances and clarify medication dispensation and storage requirements.
  • South Dakota progressed HB 1015 to adopt the social work licensure compact.
  • Texas proposed rule to expand the existing Department of Health’s Emergency Medical Care rules by providing telemedicine options in non-rural counties and expanding the use of telemedicine in rural counties, by integrating the use of telemedicine by Advanced Practice Provider (APP) in Rural Level IV trauma facilities under certain circumstances.
  • Utah progressed HB 44 to adopt the social work licensure compact.
  • Wisconsin proposed a rule to amend current standards of practice for supervising physical therapist assistants to incorporate new telehealth practices. Specifically, the current supervision rules require supervision physical therapists to provide on-site assessment and reevaluation of each patient at least once each calendar month or every 10th treatment day, whichever is sooner, while new telehealth practices permit patients to receive treatments using telehealth. The new rule will resolve the conflict between the on-site assessment and reevaluation requirements for supervision and patients’ ability to schedule telehealth visits.
  • Wisconsin progressed AB 573 and AB 541to the second chamber. AB 573 directs the Department of Health Services to establish a pilot program to implement virtual behavioral health crisis care services for use by county or municipal law enforcement agencies in the field to connect law enforcement officers who encounter persons in crisis to behavioral healthcare services. AB 541 provides that no mental health care provider may be required to be licensed, registered, certified, or otherwise approved to practice in the state to provide mental health services by telehealth to patients located in the state unless mental health care provider satisfies certain conditions.

Why it matters:

  • There continues to be elevated activity surrounding licensure compacts. This week, Florida, South Dakota and Utah progressed laws to adopt interstate licensure compacts.
  • States continue to progress laws to incorporate the use of telehealth in practitioners’ scope of practice. This week, several states progressed legislation expanding practitioners’ scope of practice to include telehealth services under certain circumstances.

Telehealth is an important development in care delivery, but the regulatory patchwork is complicated. The McDermott digital health team works alongside the industry’s leading providers, payors and technology innovators to help them enter new markets, break [...]

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Trending in Telehealth: January 4 – 15, 2024

Trending in Telehealth highlights state legislative and regulatory developments that impact the healthcare providers, telehealth and digital health companies, pharmacists and technology companies that deliver and facilitate the delivery of virtual care.

Trending in the past week:

  • Econsults
  • Medical cannabis
  • Out-of-state practitioners

A CLOSER LOOK

Finalized Legislation & Rulemaking

  • Alaska adopted a final rule, which updates the Board of Professional Counselors regulations related to distance professional services to clarify supervision requirements for distance professional services.
  • Colorado passed a final rule amending the Medical Assistance Act’s corresponding rules to authorize reimbursement of Electronic Consultation (eConsults) performed through Medicaid’s authorized eConsult platform.
  • New Jersey enacted SB 3604, which authorizes the use of healthcare platforms that provide discounted prices for payment of prescription and non-prescription drugs or devices and for telehealth and telemedicine services.
  • Oregon adopted a final rule, which amends Oregon Medical Board Rules (OAR 847-025-0020) to align the rules with the Oregon 2023 Law (SB 232). The amended rule allows out-of-state physicians and physician assistants who have an established relationship with a patient to provide continuity of care via telemedicine on a periodic or intermittent basis when the patient is located in Oregon.
  • Virginia adopted a final rule establishing applications, licenses, permits, and registrations for its Medical Cannabis Program. The final rule permits practitioners to provide patient care and evaluation using telemedicine, provided that the use of telemedicine follows certain parameters.
  • Utah adopted a final rule, which moves content governing the Human Services Program Licensing Office’s processes to a new division-wide rule. While the definition of telehealth remains the same, the relevant sections of the law have a new citation.

Legislation & Rulemaking Activity in Proposal Phase
Highlights:

  • Iowa Board of Speech Pathology and Audiology proposed a rule to rescind Chapter 301, Practice of Speech Pathologists and Audiologists, Iowa Administrative Code, and adopt a new chapter with the same title. The proposed rule will provide definitions relevant to the practice of speech pathologists and audiologists and requirements for telehealth appointments. Further, the rule will articulate practice standards and provide a scope of practice for the profession. Comments are due by January 31, 2024.
  • Nevada proposed a rule to amend the Board of Examiners for Social Workers rules to prohibit a licensee from providing services through telehealth to a client located outside the State of Nevada unless the licensee is authorized to do so under the laws of the jurisdiction where the client is located.
  • New Jersey progressed AB 5311 in the second chamber. If passed, the legislation would enact the Counseling Compact in New Jersey.
  • Tennessee progressed SB 1674, which would amend existing TennCare rules, or promulgate new rules, on fee-for-service and Medicaid managed care plans to allow for the reimbursement of remote ultrasound procedures and remote fetal nonstress tests that utilize established CPT codes for [...]

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2024: The Year of the Telehealth Cliff

What does December 31, 2024, mean to you? New Year’s Eve? Post-2024 election? Too far away to know?

Our answer: December 31, 2024, is when we will go over a “telehealth cliff” if Congress fails to act before that date, directly impacting care and access for Medicare beneficiaries. What is this telehealth cliff? Let’s back up a bit.

TELEHEALTH COVERAGE POLICIES

Current statute (1834(m) of the Social Security Act) lays out payment and coverage policies for Medicare telehealth services. As written, the provisions significantly limit Medicare providers’—and therefore patients’—ability to utilize telehealth services. Some examples:

  • If the patient is in their home when the telehealth service is being provided, telehealth is generally not eligible for reimbursement.
  • Providers cannot bill for telehealth services provided via audio-only communication.
  • There is a narrow list of providers who are eligible to seek reimbursement for telehealth services.

COVID-19-RELATED TELEHEALTH FLEXIBILITIES

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in 2020, a public health emergency (PHE) was declared. Congress passed several laws, and the administration acted through its own authorities to provide flexibilities around these Medicare telehealth restrictions. In general, nearly all statutory limitations on telehealth were lifted during the PHE. As we all know, utilization of telehealth skyrocketed.

The PHE ended last year, and through subsequent congressional efforts and regulatory actions by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), many flexibilities were extended beyond the end of the PHE, through December 31, 2024. Congress and CMS continue to grapple with how to support the provision of Medicare telehealth services for the future.

CMS has taken steps through the annual payment rule, the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS), to align many of the payment and coverage policies for which it has regulatory authority with congressional deadlines. CMS has also restructured its telehealth list, giving more clarity to stakeholders and Congress as to which pandemic-era telehealth services could continue if an extension is passed. But CMS can’t address the statutory limitations on its own. Congress must legislate. CMS highlighted this in the final calendar year (CY) 2024 MPFS rule released on November 2, 2023, noting that “while the CAA, 2023, does extend certain COVID-19 PHE flexibilities, including allowing the beneficiary’s home to serve as an originating site, such flexibilities are only extended through the end of CY 2024.”

THE TELEHEALTH CLIFF

This brings us to the telehealth cliff. CMS generally releases the annual MPFS proposed rule in July, with the final rule coming on or around November 1. If history is any indication, Congress is not likely to act on the extensions much before the current December 31 deadline. This sets up the potential for a high level of uncertainty headed into 2025.

If we go over, this telehealth cliff would directly impact care and access for Medicare beneficiaries. The effects could be felt acutely in rural and underserved areas, where patients have been able to access, via telehealth, medical services that may have been out of reach for them in the past. The telehealth cliff would [...]

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Trending in Telehealth: December 21, 2023 – January 3, 2024

Trending in Telehealth highlights state legislative and regulatory developments that impact the healthcare providers, telehealth and digital health companies, pharmacists and technology companies that deliver and facilitate the delivery of virtual care.

Trending in the past week:

  • Behavioral health
  • Interstate compacts

A CLOSER LOOK
Finalized Legislation & Rulemaking

  • Arkansas issued a final rule whereby certain assessments under the Arkansas Independent Assessment (ARIA) system may be performed via telemedicine. The ARIA system is used to perform a functional-needs assessment for eligible Medicaid beneficiaries served through one of the state’s waiver programs or state plan personal care services.
  • Mississippi issued a final rule, which adds Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists and Mississippi State Department of Health clinics to the list of Medicaid-covered providers for telehealth services. The final rule also clarifies that Medicaid would not cover physician or other practitioner visits through telehealth for Evaluation and Management Level IV or V visits.
  • New Jersey signed AB 5757  into law on December 31, 2023. This substitute bill amends Section 11 of P.L.2021, c.310 to extend the end date from December 31, 2023, to December 31, 2024, during which time a health benefits plan in New Jersey must extend coverage and payment parity for telehealth services. Healthcare services delivered to a covered person through telemedicine or telehealth must be covered at a rate equal to the in-person provider reimbursement rate, provided the services are otherwise covered by the health benefits plan when delivered in-person.
  • Washington, DC, issued a final rule updating Medicaid’s Assertive Community Treatment reimbursement methodology from a fee-for-service model to a monthly rate model. The new model requires eight (8) contacts with a consumer per calendar month. Three (3) of the required eight (8) contacts can be performed via . The Assertive Community Treatment program provides intensive, integrated, rehabilitative treatment and community-based to adults with serious and persistent mental illness.
  • Virginia joins the Counseling Licensure Compact, effective January 1, 2024. The authorizing bill was signed into law on March 27, 2023, with a delayed effective date.

Legislation & Rulemaking Activity in Proposal Phase
Highlights:

  • In New Jersey, AB 5311 passed the General Assembly with a vote of 73-0-0. If enacted, the bill would enter New Jersey into the Counseling Compact.
  • New Jersey’s General Assembly also passed SB 3604 with a vote of 74-0-0. The bill authorizes the use of healthcare platforms that provide discounted prices for payment of prescription and nonprescription drugs or devices and for telehealth and telemedicine services.

Why it matters:

  • There continues to be an increase in activity surrounding licensure compacts. States closed the year by adopting interstate compacts for a variety of professionals. In general, these state efforts ease the burdens of the licensing process and demonstrate a desire to facilitate multijurisdictional practice without giving up authority over professional licensure.
  • States continue to pass rules to increase access to behavioral [...]

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Trending in Telehealth: December 14, 2023 – December 20, 2023

Trending in Telehealth highlights state legislative and regulatory developments that impact the healthcare providers, telehealth and digital health companies, pharmacists and technology companies that deliver and facilitate the delivery of virtual care.

Trending in the past week:

  • Telehealth pilot programs
  • Standards of practice

A CLOSER LOOK
Finalized Legislation & Rulemaking

  • Effective February 1, 2024, the Wisconsin Hearing and Speech Examining Board clarified, by final rule, the standard of care for hearing instrument specialists and audiologists. The final rule defines telehealth; expands the scope of unprofessional conduct; and requires licensure for a person engaged in the practice of selling or fitting hearing aids to a patient located in the state, whether in-person or via telehealth.

Legislation & Rulemaking Activity in Proposal Phase
Highlights:

  • New Jersey continues to progress Assembly Bill 5311. If enacted, the bill will enter New Jersey into the Counseling Compact.
  • Wisconsin progressed AB 573 and AB 541. AB 573 directs the Department of Health Services to establish a pilot program to implement virtual behavioral health crisis care services for use by county or municipal law enforcement agencies in the field. The service will connect law enforcement officers who encounter persons in crisis to behavioral healthcare services. AB 541 provides that no mental health care provider may be required to be licensed, registered, certified or otherwise approved to practice in Wisconsin to provide mental health services by telehealth to patients located in Wisconsin if the mental health care provider satisfies certain conditions, including:
    • the mental health care provider is licensed, registered, certified or otherwise approved to practice in the state in which the provider is physically present when providing telehealth services;
    • the mental health care provider may provide telehealth services in Wisconsin within the scope of his or her license, registration, certification or approval from the state from which the mental health care provider is providing telehealth services; and
    • the mental health care provider informs the patient whether the provider is licensed in Wisconsin, what state he or she is providing telehealth services from, what states in which he or she is licensed, registered, certified or otherwise approved to practice, and which regulatory boards the patient may contact to file a complaint.
  • The Texas State Board of Dental Examiners issued a proposed rule that would amend 22 Tex. Admin. Code § 111.5 related to electronic prescribing waivers. The proposed amendment removes the requirement that a dentist must submit a written statement and supporting documentation describing the circumstances necessitating a waiver, and instead requires a dentist to attest to the circumstances necessitating a waiver. The board indicates that the amendment will make it less burdensome on the dentist when submitting a waiver request to the board and it will make the Board’s waiver process more efficient. The comment deadline is January 14, 2024.

Why it matters:




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Trending in Telehealth: December 6 – December 13, 2023

Trending in Telehealth highlights state legislative and regulatory developments that impact the healthcare providers, telehealth and digital health companies, pharmacists and technology companies that deliver and facilitate the delivery of virtual care.

Trending in the past week:

  • Standards of practice
  • Interstate compacts

A CLOSER LOOK
Finalized Legislation & Rulemaking

  • Alaska’s Department of Commerce, Community, and Economic Development issued a final rule to clarify that the Alaska Board of Nursing may discipline a licensee by assessing a civil fine, in accordance with central licensing statutes, for each finding the board makes of a cause for discipline. The final rule also updates the standard of practice for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) for services provided via telehealth and adopts by reference the American Association of Nurse Practitioners’ position statement on telehealth. While the position statement reflects broad support for telehealth and payment parity, the final rule is much more specific. Effective January 5, 2024, 12 AAC 44.925 will be readopted to clarify that an APRN must provide the same standard of care to a patient who is at a different location as would be provided to that patient in person. The final rule also clarifies that an APRN may practice telehealth if (1) the APRN is licensed and (2) the APRN or another licensed healthcare provider is available to provide follow-up care. Finally, the rule provides that for a telehealth encounter, an APRN must complete and document:
    1. The patient’s informed consent to use telehealth technologies;
    2. A clinical history and review of systems establishing diagnoses and identifying conditions and contraindications to recommended treatment;
    3. A plan of care that lists all recommendations and prescriptions issued by electronic means;
    4. The patient and provider locations at the time of the telehealth visit; and
    5. The provider-patient relationship prior to prescribing.
  • As previewed last week, Wisconsin enacted SB 196 and SB 197. The bills enact the Counseling Compact and Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Interstate Compact.

Legislation & Rulemaking Activity in Proposal Phase
Highlights:

  • New Jersey AB 5311 passed the General Assembly with a vote of 73-0. If enacted, the bill would enter New Jersey into the Counseling Compact.

Why it matters:

  • There continues to be an increase in activity surrounding licensure compacts. Consistent with past months, states intend to close the year by adopting interstate compacts for a variety of professionals. In general, these state efforts ease the burdens of the licensing process and demonstrate a desire to facilitate multijurisdictional practice without giving up authority over professional licensure.
  • States continue to amend and clarify telehealth-related standards of care. Following the advent of novel telehealth-related modalities, states continue to adopt and revise the definition of various standards of care to address telehealth-related concerns and provide certainty for providers predominately practicing in the remote space.

Telehealth is an important development in care [...]

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Trending in Telehealth: November 29 – December 05, 2023

Trending in Telehealth highlights state legislative and regulatory developments that impact the healthcare providers, telehealth and digital health companies, pharmacists and technology companies that deliver and facilitate the delivery of virtual care.

Trending in the past week:

  • Interstate Compacts

A CLOSER LOOK
Finalized Legislation & Rulemaking

  • Ohio issued a final rule clarifying when annual assessments performed by registered nurses (RNs) under the Ohio home care waiver program may be conducted via telehealth. Ohio issued another final rule in connection with the Ohio home and community-based services program clarifying the same. In short, at least twice per year, the RN will conduct RN assessment visits in person. All other RN assessment service visits may be conducted via telehealth, unless the individual’s needs necessitate an in-person visit.
  • In Oregon, the Oregon Health Authority issued a final rule updating and amending certain defined terms under the Medical Assistance Program, including “telehealth,” “telemedicine,” “telecommunication technologies,” “asynchronous” and “meaningful access.”

Legislation & Rulemaking Activity in Proposal Phase
Highlights:

  • Wisconsin presented Senate Bill 196 and Senate Bill 197 to the governor. The bills propose to enact the Counseling Compact and Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Interstate Compact.

Why it matters:

  • There continues to be an increase in activity surrounding licensure compacts. This year has seen an uptick in legislative activity by states seeking to ease out-of-state licensure barriers through the use of interstate compacts. Healthcare licensure compacts offer benefits to providers, licensing boards and states by enabling professionals to meet increased patient needs while maintaining state sovereignty and patient safety. Wisconsin’s advancing proposal to enter multiple interstate licensure compacts represents a continued effort by state lawmakers to improve access to care for its state’s residents.
  • States continue to amend and clarify telehealth-related definitions. Following the advent of novel telehealth-related standards of care, states continue to amend and clarify definitions, including incorporating those definitions across state healthcare programs.

Telehealth is an important development in care delivery, but the regulatory patchwork is complicated. The McDermott digital health team works alongside the industry’s leading providers, payors and technology innovators to help them enter new markets, break down barriers to delivering accessible care and mitigate enforcement risk through proactive compliance. Are you working to make healthcare more accessible through telehealth? Let us help you transform telehealth.




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