Does GDPR Regulate My Research Studies in the United States?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) establishes protections for the privacy and security of personal data (Personal Data) about individuals in the European Union (EU) single market countries, and potentially affects the clinical and other scientific research activities of academic medical centers and other research organizations in the United States.

This On the Subject includes frequently asked questions that discuss the extent to which United States research organizations must comply with GDPR when conducting research. Future coverage will address the impact of GDPR on other aspects of the United States health care sector.

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Daniel F. GottliebDaniel F. Gottlieb
Daniel F. Gottlieb counsels a wide range of health care industry clients, including health care providers, health plans, health information technology (IT) vendors and life sciences companies. He represents these entities on health IT acquisitions, privacy and data protection, reimbursement, fraud and abuse, and other health care regulatory and transactional matters. Daniel is a co-leader of the Firm’s Global Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice. Read Daniel Gottlieb's full bio.


Bernadette M. BroccoloBernadette M. Broccolo
  Bernadette M. Broccolo has been counseling health industry organizations for more than 37 years on leading-edge health industry relationship formation and realignments. Her areas of concentration include privacy, technology contracting, corporate governance, human subject protection and federal taxation of exempt organizations. Bernadette speaks and writes frequently on emerging health care topics of importance to her clients and the industry. Read Bernadette Broccolo's full bio.


Ashley WintonAshley Winton
Ashley Winton focuses his practice on global data protection and privacy, information governance and cybersecurity compliance. He has particularly in-depth knowledge of cyber breach response, cybersecurity in the context of payment systems, the lawful interception of data, and the conflict of laws in relation to corporate and government investigations and international litigation. Ashley frequently represents major corporations, trade associations, charities and government entities on a range of data privacy and cybersecurity issues and he has significant experience in advising on the impact of privacy and cybersecurity law on cloud services, health care and international data transfers. Read Ashley Winton's full bio.


Amy C. PimentelAmy C. Pimentel
Amy C. Pimentel focuses her practice on privacy and data security and general health law. Her clients operate in a variety of industries, including health care, consumer products, retail, food and beverage, technology, banking and other financial services. Read Amy Pimentel's full bio.


Matthew R. CinMatthew R. Cin
Matthew R. Cin focuses his practice in technology transactional and regulatory matters, with particular focus on software licensing and data privacy and security in the United States and internationally. He represents technology companies, cloud service providers, health care providers, health information technology vendors, retailers, financial institutions and consumer analysis providers with US and international privacy, security and security breach response issues, including navigating the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, Federal Trade Commission Act, Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, Telephone Consumer Protection Act, Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, General Data Protection Regulation, and other international, federal and state laws. Read Matthew Cin's full bio.

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