Telemedicine Regulation
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Digital Health Drives Forward – A Roadmap of Regulations

New digital health regulations arose at the federal and state level in 2018, bolstering the existing legal framework to further support and encourage digital health adoption in the context of care coordination and the move to value-based payment. McDermott’s 2018 Digital Health Year in Review: Focus on Care Coordination and Reimbursement report – the second in a four-part series – highlighted these developments within the digital health landscape. These efforts brought changes to coverage of telehealth and other virtual care services, as well as information gathering for regulatory reform, and can help bridge the gap between research, funding and implementation as regulations build a framework within which companies can deploy their products, receive reimbursement and demonstrate value to patients. Here we outline digital health developments from the second half of 2018 and how they can help drive digital health forward in 2019. For a closer look at key care coordination and reimbursement developments that shaped digital health in 2018, along with planning considerations and predictions for the digital health frontier in the year ahead, download our full report.

To view the first report in the series, 2018 Digital Health Year in Review: Focus on Data, click here.




Texas Changes its Tone on Telemedicine

As one of the last states to retain highly restrictive (and arguably anti-competitive) telemedicine practice standards, health care providers, regulatory boards, technology companies, payors and other stakeholders have been actively monitoring Texas’ approach to telemedicine regulation and the related Teladoc case. Texas has eliminated its most restrictive requirement for delivering care via telemedicine in Texas, increasing opportunities for providers to reach patients using technology.  Senate Bill 1107 was passed on May 11, 2017, and the House added an amendment in passing Senate Bill 1107, which was approved in the Senate on May 18.  The bill was signed into law by Governor Abbott last weekend.

Read the full article.




Arkansas is at it Again! Telemedicine Regulation in Arkansas Undergoes Additional Change

Arkansas currently has one of the most restrictive telemedicine environments in the country, and was one of the last states to require an in-person examination to form a provider-patient relationship. Prior to September 2016, Arkansas telemedicine laws required an initial in-person encounter to establish a valid physician-patient relationship. In September 2016, the state expanded the formation of a provider-patient relationship to include a face-to-face examination using both real time audio and visual telemedicine technology that provides information at least equivalent to the information that would have been obtained through an in-person examination.

Then, early last month, Arkansas Senate’s Public Health, Welfare and Labor Committee approved Senate Bill 146, which was signed by the Governor and became Arkansas Act 203 on February 20th, which further amended the state’s telemedicine laws to, among other things, enable patients to access telemedicine services from their home or other remote locations. The Act modified the “originating site” location requirement, redefining “originating site” to permit services to be provided wherever the patient is located at the time of the consult.  While this change has the potential to expand the use of telemedicine in Arkansas, the Act added more to its restriction on the formation of a professional relationship through telemedicine, as it states that a professional relationship cannot be formed through an internet questionnaire, email message, patient-generated medical history, audio-only communication, text messaging, fax machine or any combination of these technologies. This provision reaffirms that a patient relationship can only be formed in Arkansas with an Arkansas-licensed provider utilizing both real time audio and visual technology.

Notably, the Act also has implications for school-based telemedicine programs, which are increasing in popularity across the country. Arkansas requires school-based telemedicine programs that treat Medicaid recipients to utilize either the minor’s regular pediatrician or other primary care physician; a physician with a cross-coverage arrangement with the regular pediatrician or primary care physician; or have authorization from the regular pediatrician or other primary care physician of the minor.  (In most cases, school-based telemedicine programs require a parent’s consent for telemedicine services, and a child’s pediatrician or other primary care provider is notified after the child treated via telemedicine.) This specific provision is particularly protective of the role of treating physicians, but does not include the requirement that a parent or guardian have the power to consent to the formation of a physician-patient relationship with a minor, which is ordinarily expected.

In sum, while the law will not make Arkansas a leader in expanded access to telemedicine, it will help bring Arkansas into line with the rest of the US.




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