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New Podcast | Protecting Your Tech: IP Considerations in Digital Health

Digital health companies are producing innovative products at a rapidly accelerating pace and experiencing a boom in investments and demand as the regulatory environment becomes more supportive of digital health services to both improve patient care and stay profitable. Protecting intellectual property (IP) and building a feasible data strategy to support the research and development endeavor are essential steps for companies in their drive toward commercialization and return on their investment. On this episode of the Of Digital Interest podcast, McDermott partners Bernadette Broccolo (Health) and Ahsan Shaikh (IP), explore key issues for digital health companies, their collaboration partners and investors, and start-ups to consider, including:

  • What is currently patent eligible in the digital health space?
  • What patent-eligible trends and opportunities are we seeing?
  • How do laws governing data sharing among digital health collaborators impact the research and development effort and associated IP rights?
  • What challenges and opportunities do artificial intelligence, blockchain and machine learning present for digital health innovators?

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New Podcast: Whose Data is it Anyway? Collaboration in Digital Health

The demand for healthcare innovation is driving collaboration between formerly disparate healthcare companies and bringing in new players, such as technology companies and start-ups, into an already complex space. As companies build partnerships and pool resources – particularly healthcare data – data ownership presents numerous challenges that need to be addressed throughout the lifecycle of the collaboration. In this episode of the Of Digital Interest podcast McDermott partners Jiayan Chen and Jennifer S. Geetter explore:

  • Key concerns for companies executing data-driven collaborations
  • Consumer expectations surrounding data use, data privacy and their impact on digital health collaborations
  • The role of HIPAA and federal and state regulators in regulating data use
  • Common questions about secondary use and identifiable and deidentified data
  • Commercialization strategies and “green flags” for identifying the right collaboration partner

Click here to listen to this episode.




Around the Corner in Digital Health: What’s Next for Care Coordination & Reimbursement?

The end of 2018 and the first months of 2019 brought a number of regulatory developments impacting care coordination and the adoption and reimbursement of digital health services. From the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care and Pathways to Success initiatives to the updated Physician Fee Schedule, speakers Dale Van Demark and Lisa Schmitz Mazur discuss the rules and regulations that have the potential to enhance or hinder access to digital health solutions and how digital health companies can position themselves for success in this evolving regulatory landscape.

Click here to listen to this episode of the Of Digital Interest podcast. 




Telemedicine – The New Standard of Care

Across the health care sector, telemedicine is naturally and strategically being integrated into health care delivery and treatment plans as targeted and efficient solutions to specific health issues by hospitals, medical groups and drug-to-consumer telemedicine companies.

Telemedicine is no longer viewed as a secondary option for care—it is a new standard of care that is both expected by patients and popular with providers. Consumers expect to see health care adapt—like many other industries already have—to fit within their daily lives and schedules. Whether it’s electronic check-in procedures or better automated systems, health care providers are beginning to treat their patients a little bit more like customers, and see telemedicine and patient engagement tools as a means of improving customer loyalty and engagement while reducing costs.

However, complex billing structure and payor and reimbursement issues can create significant hurdles for health care providers looking to advance telemedicine programs. Telemedicine billing requires special attention, and if not enough consideration is given on the front end of programs, organizations may be surprised to find that that something they thought was a billable service is, in fact, not.

The Bipartisan Budget Act, which provided for the reimbursement of the distance provider, significantly increased the telemedicine use cases that are approved under the Medicare reimbursement structure. However, because Congress will now pay for it, there is a new expectation that hospitals that do not have particular areas of expertise available on-site will investigate opportunities to incorporate a telehealth programs that ensure adequate patient care.

The standard of care continues to improve as patients have greater access to  nationwide physicians and  as new technology like telestroke and clinical decision support tools become more widely available. For example, a stroke neurologist in one New York can now diagnose a stroke patient in Florida, and then facilitate an emergency room physician to treat that stroke. Telestroke programs check off all of the right boxes: better quality care, better access to care, and overall lower cost of care.

As use cases like this continue to be integrated into health care delivery and familiarity builds around how telemedicine can be used effectively, expectations shift around the standard of care and new questions arise around the risks of integrating—or failing to integrate—telehealth programs. If the tools are available and easily accessible, and if there is a supportive reimbursement model, how much a part of the standard of care does telemedicine become and what is the risk of failing to embrace these tools? If hospitals choose not to implement telehealth programs, and then patients suffer harm as a result, for example a delayed diagnosis and treatment of a stroke, could that lead to increased medical malpractice suits or other types of liability?

In the newest episode of the Of Digital Interest podcast, McDermott Digital Health partners, Lisa Schmitz Mazur and Dale Van Demark, share their perspectives on these questions and the various barriers, risks and opportunities associated with the rise of telemedicine and other technological advancements in health care delivery. Access this [...]

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