Outsourcing
Subscribe to Outsourcing's Posts

Double Trouble for Data Transfers Post-Brexit and Post-Schrems II?

On 16 July 2020, Europe’s highest court, the CJEU, ruled in Data Protection Commissioner v. Facebook Ireland Limited, Maximillian Schrems that individuals in Europe had insufficient redress against US bulk interception rules when their personal data was transferred to the United States under the US Department of Commerce “Privacy Shield” mechanism. This ruling followed a long running campaign by the activist, Max Schrems, who’s prior case to the CJEU invalidated the predecessor to the Privacy Shield, the Safe Harbor.

It is a general tenet of European data protection law that, when personal data is exported from the European Union, any further processing must be to European standards unless the local data protection laws are considered “adequate” by the European Commission. Self-certification under the US Privacy Shield mechanism was a popular method for providing adequate data protection amongst US based service providers which had European customers and regularly needed to transfer personal data from Europe to the United States.

Schrems II impacts not only the over 5,300 US companies that enjoyed Privacy Shield self-certification, but also the many thousands of EU and US companies that rely upon US companies in their supply chain for data processing. This supply chain could include outsourcing, cloud services, data processing, data storage, telecommunications and the like.

Click here to read the full article, and many more in our latest International News: Focus on Global Privacy and Cybersecurity.




Brazil’s LGPD Takes Effect—With Early Enforcement

Brazil represents over half of all IT spend in Latin America, has the largest regional market for software outsourcing, employs a sizable IT workforce, manufactures consumer goods (including commercial airplanes and cars) and has an active consumer market of social media operated by global data aggregators. At a time when data privacy is becoming increasingly important to consumers, it seems only fitting that Brazil would adopt comprehensive privacy legislation to protect data privacy rights.

The General Data Protection Law, the first law of its kind in Brazil, is now in effect, and we are already seeing enforcement. Streamlining the legal framework on data protection, the law sets forth a number of requirements addressing legal bases for processing, individual rights, governance and accountability and data transfers.

Access the article.




STAY CONNECTED

TOPICS

ARCHIVES

2021 Chambers USA top ranked firm
LEgal 500 EMEA top tier firm 2021