Office of Management and Budget
Subscribe to Office of Management and Budget's Posts

Can We Expect to See ONC’s Final Rule on Information Blocking Soon?

A recent update to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) website suggests that the answer is “yes”—though that depends on how one defines “soon.” According to its website, OMB received the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology’s (ONC’s) final rule, entitled 21st Century Cures Act: Interoperability, Information Blocking, and the ONC Health IT Certification Program, for review on October 28, 2019. Based on the rule title, it appears that ONC is ready to finalize its proposals concerning information blocking and related exceptions. Earlier this year, ONC issued a proposed rule that, among other things, proposed to define information blocking and establish seven exceptions to the broad prohibition for reasonable and necessary activities that should not be considered information blocking. For more information about the information blocking provisions of ONC’s proposed rule, see our On the Subjects here and here. OMB review is one...

Continue Reading

ONC Sends Information Blocking Proposed Rule to OMB

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) is one step closer to issuing its long-awaited proposed rule to implement various provisions of the 21st Century Cures Act, including proposed regulations distinguishing between prohibited health information blocking among health care providers and health information technology vendors and other permissible restrictions on access to health information. According to its website, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) received ONC’s proposed rule for review on September 17, 2018. OMB review is one of the final steps in the process before a proposed rule is published in the Federal Register for public comments. OMB did not identify a deadline for completing its review. The agency generally has up to 90 days to complete its review, but can take less time than that. In addition to defining the scope of prohibited information blocking conduct, the proposed rule is likely to address...

Continue Reading

HHS Finalizes Overhaul of Federal Human Subjects Research Protections

On January 18, 2017, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and 15 other federal agencies issued a final rule overhauling the federal human subjects research regulations known as the “Common Rule.” These are the first revisions to the Common Rule since its original enactment in 1991, and have been in progress since HHS first published an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in July 2011. According to the press release accompanying the final rule, HHS made “significant changes” to its most recent proposals (published in September 2015) in response to the 2,100+ public comments they received. The majority of the Common Rule’s changes and new provisions will go into effect in 2018. We are reviewing the final rule in detail, and a summary of changes and new provisions is forthcoming.

Continue Reading

OMB Reviewing Common Rule Overhaul

On January 4, 2017, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) submitted a draft final rule to amend the federal human research regulations to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). These regulations, often referred to as the Common Rule, were originally developed in 1991 and have been adopted by multiple federal departments and agencies. OMB review is the last step before final publication and suggests that HHS is trying to release a final rule before President Obama leaves office on January 20, 2017. Through its Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), HHS initially published an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in July 2011. The Advanced Notice generated significant controversy and OHRP did not publish a notice of proposed rulemaking (Proposed Rule) for over four years, ultimately doing so on September 8, 2015. The Proposed Rule, like its earlier Advanced Notice counterpart, suggested major changes to the Common Rule, including changes...

Continue Reading

STAY CONNECTED

TOPICS

ARCHIVES