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Matthew R. Cin focuses his practice in technology transactional and regulatory matters, with particular focus on software licensing and data privacy and security in the United States and internationally. He represents technology companies, cloud service providers, health care providers, health information technology vendors, retailers, financial institutions and consumer analysis providers with US and international privacy, security and security breach response issues, including navigating the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, Federal Trade Commission Act, Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, Telephone Consumer Protection Act, Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, General Data Protection Regulation, and other international, federal and state laws. Read Matthew Cin's full bio.

California’s Senate and Assembly unanimously approved AB 375 (also known as the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018), on June 28, 2018. This new consumer privacy bill will be the most progressive and comprehensive privacy law in the United States, reaching far beyond California’s borders to give California consumers more visibility and control over their personal information.

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Last week, the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit issued a long-awaited decision on an omnibus challenge to the FCC’s interpretation of the TCPA. While the decision provides some relief for businesses, it does not eliminate the prospect of TCPA liability and leaves important TCPA interpretive questions unresolved. Businesses should continue to be vigilant regarding consent and opt-out procedures when sending automated text messages and automated or pre-recorded calls to consumers. Continue Reading

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) establishes protections for the privacy and security of personal data (Personal Data) about individuals in the European Union (EU) single market countries, and potentially affects the clinical and other scientific research activities of academic medical centers and other research organizations in the United States.

This On the Subject includes frequently asked questions that discuss the extent to which United States research organizations must comply with GDPR when conducting research. Future coverage will address the impact of GDPR on other aspects of the United States health care sector.

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